Author Bio:

My latest essay, “What The Plague Can Teach Us About Ourselves,” is a timely work about the relationship between Camus’s 1947 novel and the world we find ourselves in at the moment.

Michael White’s latest novel is Resting Places (March 2016) won the Tuscany Prize for Best Novel. His six other novels include:

  • Soul Catcher, which was a Booksense and Historical Novels Review selection, as well as a finalist for the Connecticut Book Award.
  • A Brother’s Blood, which was a New York Times Book Review Notable Book and a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers nominee.
  • The Blind Side of the Heart, an Alternate Book-of-the-Month Club selection.
  • A Dream of Wolves, which received starred reviews from Booklist and Publisher’s Weekly.
  • The Garden of Martyrs, also a Connecticut Book Award finalist and made into an opera of the same name.
  • Beautiful Assassin, which won the Connecticut Book Award.
  • A collection of his short stories, Marked Men, was published by the University of Missouri Press.

He has also published over 45 short stories in national magazines and journals, and has won the Advocate Newspapers Fiction Award and been nominated for both a National Magazine Award and a Pushcart. He was the founding editor of the yearly fiction anthology American Fiction as well as Dogwood.

He was the founder and former director of Fairfield University’s low-residency MFA Creative Writing Program. He lives on an old horse-farm in Madison, CT with his wife Reni and his two Labs Henry and Falstaff and writes in a cabin in the woods.

Beautiful Assassin…is a superb 1940s drama…a winner that condemns nations for their expendable deployment of individuals.
Harriet Klausner

The Garden of Martyrs – A meticulously researched and richly drawn portrait of the lives of two Irish-Catholic immigrants and their priest. Michael C. White has delivered a historical novel of lasting contemporary resonance.
A. Mannette Ansay, author of Vinegar Hill

Soul Catcher has as many twists and turns as a good thriller; most readers will probably be unable to predict what happens in the final pages.
Connecticut Post